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We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
We understand that you are dynamic,so our approach is dynamic and personalized.
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PTSD

Listen as Dr. Barclay discusses common myths about PTSD.

What is PTSD?

Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) is an anxiety disorder. It has a lifetime prevalence rate of almost 7%. Most associate PTSD with combat, however, PTSD is diagnosed more often in civilian populations. PTSD can occur following the exposure to a traumatic event such as a natural disaster, begin the victim of abuse, or a violent crime. Not everyone who experiences these events get PTSD. It is important to note that if you’ve been exposed to such events, particularly if it is recent, irritability and mood dysregulation is normal. However, if irritability, emotional sensitivity, recurrent and intrusive memories of the event, disturbances in sleep and relationships, and avoidance of triggers that bring on these symptoms continue to occur more than 30 after the initial event, you may have PTSD. Such disturbances within 30 days of the event is called Acute Stress disorder and is normal. For most people, these symptoms remit. If they persist, you may have PTSD and will need to see a mental health professional. 

How do I know if I have PTSD?

As mentioned above, PTSD is diagnosed after 30 days and can be months following the exposure to a traumatic event. If you’re experiencing the symptoms disrobed above within the 30 day mark, you have Acute Stress disorder and should seek treatment to prevent the onset of PTSD. PTSD can be debilitating leaving one to experience mood swings that include severe depression, anxiety, and outbursts of anger. 

How is PTSD treated?

PTSD can be treated with medication, psychotherapy, non-invasive brain stimulation, and neurofeedback. Advanced Psychotherapeutics has researched based experience in treating PTSD with interventions that work and provide outcomes not found from other treatment facilities or agencies. Advanced Psychotherapeutics of Lynchburg and Central Virginia is the only facility in Central Virginia that offers a complex treatment approach to treat PTSD to inlclude EMDR, neurofeedback, and other non-invasive techniques.

Can PTSD be cured?

PTSD is curable. The symptoms of PTSD are created through exposure to a single or chronic events that are life threatening. The exposure to such events changes brain function in the form of an overactive sympathetic nervous system, which includes the limbic system and prefrontal cortex. While medications work to calm overreactions, mindfulness interventions, non-invasive brain stimulation, and neurofeedback have research proven effectiveness that is better than medications alone. Advanced Psychotherapeutics of Lynchburg and Central Virginia also specializes in psychotherapy that creates resilience factors that works to rebuild a positive state of mind that keeps PTSD from taking hold and returning.